Attack by Paramilitary Group in Cacahuatepec, Guerrero, Mexico Leaves 6 Dead and Three Minors Injured

Guerrero is mourning once again. How far will this barbaric war against the people go?

By Ruptura Colective
Translated by El Enemigo Común

On Friday, June 9, at midday, members of the self-proclaimed paramilitary group “Union of Peoples and Organizations of the State of Guerrero” (UPOEG) attacked the house of a family in the community of Cacahuatepec, armed with rifles. The house is on Calle Ceiba, in the rural area of Acapulco, Guerrero.

The armed assault resulted in the death of three women, one man, a 17-year-old youth, and a baby of just four months. The Secretary of Security in Guerrero also reported that two minors, ages 8 and 11 respectively, and a one-year-old baby were wounded. After the attack was reported to the Acapulco Center for Emergency Assistance (CENATEM) by neighbors, the surviving children were taken to a hospital in the city of Acapulco by ambulance.

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War and Resistance Dispatch # 44

The face of the 43 missing and the tenacity of their families and compañeros are the other 43 dispatches on war and resistance. To them we add the pain, rage, and resistance of the originary peoples and the rebellions of millions all over Mexico and around the world.

Enlace Zapatista
September 22, 2016

To the peoples of the world:

To the alternative, free, autonomous, or whatever-you-call-it media:

To the National and International Sixth:

War and Resistance Dispatch #44

And what about the other 43? And the ones that follow?

This country has not been the same since the bad government committed one of its most heinous crimes in disappearing 43 young indigenous students of the teaching college Raúl Isidro Burgos in Ayotzinapa, Guerrero, two years ago. This event forced us to acknowledge the profound darkness in which we find ourselves today, stirring our individual and collective hearts and spirit. The rage, pain, and hope embodied in the families and compañeros of the 43 illuminate that darkness and shine on the faces of millions of people of every geography below in Mexico and around the world, as well as among a conscientious international civil society in solidarity.

As originary barrios, tribes, nations, and peoples, we begin from the collective heart that we are and turn our gaze into words.

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“I was born to be free” – Nestora Salgado

For obeying my people, for rebelling against the authorities and for being commander of the community police the government considered me a threat.

EEC note: After seventeen months in prison and following a national and international campaign for her release, political prisoner Nestora Salgado was released from Tepepan prison in Mexico City on March 18, just days after the below essay was published. The commander of the Community Police in Olinalá, Guerrero, Salgado was charged with three counts of kidnapping. When those charges were dismissed, the state filed three more charges for kidnapping, theft and murder. Again, those charges were dismissed for lack of evidence.

Upon exiting the prison, she was received by dozens of community police officers from Olinalá and other towns in Guerrero. Handed a rifle and addressed as commander, she said, “We are going to keep struggling so they don’t keep repressing us. If this is needed [raising the rifle], then this is where we will go, but we won’t allow them to keep trampling on us.” At a press conference later in the day, she committed herself to fighting for the freedom of Mexico’s 500 political prisoners, in particular those jailed for carrying out their duties as community police. Joined by members from the Peoples Front in Defense of the Land from Atenco, those resisting the construction of the La Parota dam in Guerrero, and family members of the 43 disappeared students from Ayotzinapa, she led the count from 1 to 43. “I don’t represent any political party,” she said. “I only fight for my people. Sometimes they ask me if I’m afraid. And yes, I’m afraid, but I’ll die fighting for our people’s dignity. It doesn’t matter what I have to do, I am going to win freedom for our prisoners. I will be present in all of the struggles, as long as they need me.”

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Insumisión: Resistance and Repression in Mexico

Welcome to the first edition of “Insumisión,” a new column bringing you news and analysis from social movements and struggles in Mexico.

By Scott Campbell
Originally published on It’s Going Down

Welcome to the first edition of “Insumisión,” a new column on It’s Going Down, bringing you news and analysis from social movements and struggles in the territory referred to as Mexico. Let’s get started.

As readers of It’s Going Down might already be aware, in Mexico City last Wednesday, Yorch, a member of Okupa Che, was kidnapped by police in the latest round of repression to face the autonomous, anti-authoritarian space on the campus of the National Autonomous University of Mexico, held since the 1999-2000 student strike. Police planted a backpack full of drugs on Yorch, who is now captive in a federal prison in Sonora. The morning after the arrest, compañerxs blockaded access to UNAM with burning dumpsters, and Molotov cocktails were unleashed on the UNAM Campus Security offices and patrol cars. The clamor to evict Okupa Che has steadily grown since Yorch’s arrest. Okupa Che released a statement, calling for solidarity and for people to be on alert to respond to any eviction attempt. Anarchist political prisoner Fernando Bárcenas (who received acts of solidarity from Tijuana to Bloomington earlier this year) sent an open letter in solidarity with Yorch, which reads in part:

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Ayotzinapa: Learn in order to teach

We do not agree with the way things function. We know something is wrong in the country. We have always known it. We just didn’t have a way of saying it.

[ Débora Poo Soto ]

[Spanish original]
May 15, 2015
By Débora Poo Soto
Translated by Scott Campbell

Ayotzinapa is…

For some; everything, their only option, their best chance, a house, a family, is learning:

They give you, what, food, a bedroom – that’s the room to rest in – the three meals, so for me it means: this Normal [teaching college] is everything. Here there is everything, I have everything […]

They teach you to be humble, here they teach you what is…more than anything the humility to talk with the people, to be sensitive, to respect them, since in this normal they teach you what values are, they teach us to live together with the people and also here they really instill in us to work with the people, with poor people, peasants […].*

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Activist Hip Hop for Ayotzinapa

The People’s Assembly of Activist Hip Hop in solidarity with the struggle for justice in Ayotzinapa, Guerrero.

[ Rap in Atliaca ]

The night of the 2015 spring equinox, two buses set out from Mexico City for the Ayotzinapa teacher training school. Aboard were MCs, DJs, Bboys, graffiti artists, muralists and silk screeners of the People’s Assembly of Activist Hip Hop. All were on the way to participate in an event organized with strong support of the organized teachers of Tixtla, Guerrero. Some had been in Ayotzinapa before, and others wanted to get to know the people in struggle there.

The next morning the teachers invited representatives of the Assembly to share their ideas in a radio program. Some of the organizers responded to a question about what motivated them to be there as follows:

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43 Students That Do Not Want to Disappear

Disappearances are acts of terror intended for those left behind.

[ Ayotzinapa Presente. Photo by: Brenda Burgoa ]

by Simón Sedillo

The Mexican federal government has pronounced all missing 43 Ayotzinapa students dead. Parents and supporters continue to ignore any official declarations in the matter because the government only has DNA evidence proving the death of one student. Austrian experts have declared the supposed evidence used to declare the death of the remaining 42 inconclusive and impossible to work with.

The sad truth is that average everyday folks in the USA are just not paying attention.

The disappearance of 43 rural education students in Mexico has struck an international chord elsewhere however. “Disappearance” as a concept is a tough pill to swallow anywhere. When it comes to Latin America, disappearances are not just a painful past; they are an ever painful present, and an extremely terrorizing future.

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