Self Defense Against White Supremacy: Finding a path towards community-based self-determination

One of the greatest barriers to community-based self-defense has been a very powerful shift towards pacifism and non-violence as a primary means of political expression in Europe and the USA.

By: el pinche simón

January 30th, 2017

Patriarchy and white supremacy have been the forerunners and continue to be the underpinnings of the economic, military and political system of U.S. imperialism, which is devoted to making money by any means necessary, including brute force and the legitimized use of violence. Its imposition is exposed by a glance at those who have money, power, and influence and those who do not. The price of things, places, food, labor, and people are all glaring pieces of evidence exposing the cruelty of a failed global economic model and the decline of the U.S. Empire.

We live in a military-political economy that has consistently overvalued the lives of white men above all other lives. As a matter of fact, the natural resources that are extracted from this earth to maintain white and male dominance over the planet, are considered more valuable than all lives. Most human life has become just another disposable variable in this economic equation.

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Police from 5 States Escalate Violence, Shoot Horses to Clear 1851 Treaty Camp

The Camp, a reclamation of unceded Dakota territory affirmed as part of the Standing Rock Reservation in the Ft. Laramie Treaty of 1851, was set up directly in the path of the pipeline.

[ Photo by Jonathon Klett ]

Sacred Stone Camp
October 28, 2016

Cannonball, ND – On October 27, over 300 police officers in riot gear, 8 ATVs, 5 armored vehicles, 2 helicopters, and numerous military-grade humvees showed up north of the newly formed frontline camp just east of Highway 1806. The 1851 Treaty Camp was set up this past Sunday directly in the path of the pipeline, on land recently purchased by DAPL. Today this camp, a reclamation of unceded Dakota territory affirmed as part of the Standing Rock Reservation in the Ft. Laramie Treaty of 1851, was violently cleared. Both blockades established this past weekend to enable that occupation were also cleared.

In addition to pepper spray and percussion grenades, shotguns were fired into the crowd with less lethal ammunition and a sound cannon was used (see images below). At least one person was tased and the barbed hook lodged in his face, just outside his eye. Another was hit in the face by a rubber bullet.

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Black Snake Destruction Report

The Dakota Access Pipeline Project is continuing work every single day at an accelerated speed. We need Water Protectors to come to Standing Rock and physically support this resistance now.

Red Warrior Camp
October 21, 2016

Note: This report is a synthesis of information obtained from DAPL’s official status reports and on the ground observations from vigilant water protectors on the frontline at Standing Rock.

The Black Snake is encroaching rapidly. It is apparent that DAPL is continuing work every single day at an accelerated speed. We need Water Protectors to come to Standing Rock and physically support this resistance NOW.

The Dakota Access Pipeline Project is a gargantuan pipeline measuring approximately 1,172-miles and 30-inches in diameter. The proposed route aims to continue the exploitation of the Bakken and Three Forks areas in indigenous territories from so-called North Dakota to Patoka, Illinois. The outrageously expensive $3.8 billion pipeline aims to violently extract crude oil from sacred lands and transport it to major refining markets in an exploitative and environmentally disastrous manner. The pipeline backers are knowingly prioritizing their projected fiscal profits over the imminent threat to clean drinking water for the Sioux nation and millions of people downstream of the Mississippi.

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San Pedro Tlanixco: Who says all is lost?

A rally and march around the Santiaguito prison in Almoloya de Juarez closed out a series of Activities for the Freedom of the Defenders of the Water and Life of San Pedro Tlanixco.

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“¿Quién dice que todo está perdido? (Who says all is lost?)” sang the Taller del Sur at the cultural festival held last September 25 as part of the Activities for the Freedom of the Defenders of the Water and Life of San Pedro Tlanixco.

And five days later, as the round of activities closed with a rally and march around Santiaguito prison at Almoloya de Juárez, the answer was clear. Nobody. In spite of the vicious repression brought down on this Nahua town by the State of Mexico’s (in)justice system, there’s no end to the struggle to free the eight guardians of the territory of San Pedro Tlanixco. On the contrary, as of 2014, the movement is rebuilding and getting stronger.

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War and Resistance Dispatch # 44

The face of the 43 missing and the tenacity of their families and compañeros are the other 43 dispatches on war and resistance. To them we add the pain, rage, and resistance of the originary peoples and the rebellions of millions all over Mexico and around the world.

Enlace Zapatista
September 22, 2016

To the peoples of the world:

To the alternative, free, autonomous, or whatever-you-call-it media:

To the National and International Sixth:

War and Resistance Dispatch #44

And what about the other 43? And the ones that follow?

This country has not been the same since the bad government committed one of its most heinous crimes in disappearing 43 young indigenous students of the teaching college Raúl Isidro Burgos in Ayotzinapa, Guerrero, two years ago. This event forced us to acknowledge the profound darkness in which we find ourselves today, stirring our individual and collective hearts and spirit. The rage, pain, and hope embodied in the families and compañeros of the 43 illuminate that darkness and shine on the faces of millions of people of every geography below in Mexico and around the world, as well as among a conscientious international civil society in solidarity.

As originary barrios, tribes, nations, and peoples, we begin from the collective heart that we are and turn our gaze into words.

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Red May: 10 years later, Atenco resists plunder again

Atenco resists a new attempt at land dispossession 10 years after the repression of Red May.

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Sky-rockets blast off. Machetes gleam. Atenco is in town to head up a march from the Independence Angel to the Mexico City Zocalo. More than a thousand people join in. Chants ring out: Atenco lives! The struggle continues!

The march brings two days of activities to a close –– activities organized by the Peoples’ Front in Defense of the Land (FPDT) to mark the brutal repression of May 3 – 4, 2006, in San Salvador Atenco and Texcoco, where a struggle in support of local flower vendors was in full swing. The aim of the police terror, incited by the news media, was to punish campesinos who had succeeded in stopping the most important project of the Vicente Fox administration in 2002 ––an airport that would have robbed them of their lands. Continue reading “Red May: 10 years later, Atenco resists plunder again”

We recently began to walk: ejido Tila

“Autonomy is a lifelong process. The struggle never ends. And it’s only recently that we have begun walking towards it.”

By Rata Rey
April 19, 2016
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Five months have passed since ejido Tila expelled the municipal government and declared autonomy: five months of self-determination, organizational and community restructuring, of contemplating ways to establish a government where the people command, of making collective decisions regarding the direction of the community. Nearly half a year of beginning to walk in autonomy. “Autonomy is a lifelong process. The struggle never ends. And it’s only recently that we have begun walking towards it,” says an ejidatario* comrade.

Three ejidatario comrades tell us how the process has moved forward, what its accomplishments and obstacles have been. When the community realized that it could not keep waiting for the beating from the local government and the police and paramilitaries that it supports, the residents began formulating a new way of governing themselves and taking charge of their territory. The first decision taken by the assembly was naming security commissioners and placing guards at the entrances of the town. Women and young people also participate as guards. The police rotate, all residents are asked to guard at some point. It is the community that takes care of itself: “On January 16, there was a dance and we named 50 people to protect it but in the end we were 150 people. People were surprised that the dance was so safe. Previously, when the municipality was in charge, children and mobile phones used to be stolen and people were scared. Now, though, nothing happened.”

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