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Solidarity

The Last Days in Oaxaca

December 23rd, 2006 – Xochitl writes: Dear friends and family,

After about a week of traveling around Mexico, on the run after our arrest, we returned to Oaxaca for a few days before leaving the country. It was a beguiling, heart-wrenching and stressful time.

Beguiling, because on the surface Oaxaca continues to return to normal. The PFP have decamped from the zocalo, though they are still present in the bus station and other areas of the city. As you enter the zocalo you encounter a thin line of municipal or state police in regular uniforms, in the place of spiderwebs of barbed wire and gigantic garbage dumpster barricades, with dozens of PFP at each entrance, decked out with shields, helmets, bulletproof vests and more backed up by tanquetas ready to spray pepper spray while they videotape their targets, or even plow through crowds and barricades.

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Solidarity

Many days in Oaxaca

December 3rd, 2006 – Xochitl writes: Hello again friends,

I’ve missed a bunch of days of reporting, for as many reasons as there were days.

Other than being sick with the lovely traveler’s malady, and a bad case of it, we’ve been trying to figure out how to deal with the massive repression in Oaxaca.

Since November 25 the dirty war has escalated. People from the movement have either left Oaxaca, are hiding, or moving around the city with enormous caution. There are death squads, which conduct night-time raids of movement leaders’ houses, or of anyone else known to be associated with the movement. There are reports that human rights workers have been detained in the daytime, by groups of men climbing off of a passing pickup truck and waving pistols. These human rights workers were subsequently charged with sedition (this report is from a newspaper, tho I am not sure if it has been confirmed).

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Solidarity

15th Day in Oaxaca

November 27th, 2006 – Xochitl writes: As always, I am here as a witness of the events here in Oaxaca. The real struggle, the real risks, and the real revolution is with the people of Oaxaca.

So overnight I woke up every few hours to listen to the livestream of Radio Universidad, and it continued to transmit. Just before 6 am I woke up to hear the last few bars of “Venceremos” then the Radio stopped transmitting, and there was only the background interminable march music that is broadcasted by Radio enemies to interfere with the signal. I freaked, thinking that the attack had happened, they had played one last song, and it was over. Then I realized they were taking the required several hour break from radio transmissions. Phew.

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Solidarity

14th Day in Oaxaca

November 26th, 2006 – Xochitl writes: We spent today at Radio Universidad. I was with some reporters, working to document the situation at Radio Universidad and the Cinco Senores barricade. Today there were small groups of people sitting and standing all over the place, many more than on previous days. The kitchen, which had been a collection of barrels filled with live coals in the open air, had moved across the pathway, and was now much more formal, with tarps on all sides.

We sat down and a man sitting next to us asked, “What do you think about what is going on here?”

“It is complicated,” I responded. “It seems like the longer we are here, the less we understand.” He laughed.

Categories
Solidarity

13th Day in Oaxaca

November 25th, 2006 – Xochitl writes: Greetings friends,

Today was a Mega March for APPO and the people of the state of Oaxaca. Just days ago the state governor, Ulises Ruiz Ortiz (URO) stated that the problems in Oaxaca had been solved, and that there was no further violence or conflict.

Well, he can’t say that anymore.

The march began outside the city of Oaxaca, at the governor’s palace, Tens of thousands of people marched, representing groups from communists to indigenous groups to anarchists to the teachers union. They marched and chanted, carrying banners demanding the departure of URO, the PFP (policia federal preventiva, the federal police), as well as economic and social justice for the poor and indigenous communities of the state.