Black Snake Destruction Report

The Dakota Access Pipeline Project is continuing work every single day at an accelerated speed. We need Water Protectors to come to Standing Rock and physically support this resistance now.

Red Warrior Camp
October 21, 2016

Note: This report is a synthesis of information obtained from DAPL’s official status reports and on the ground observations from vigilant water protectors on the frontline at Standing Rock.

The Black Snake is encroaching rapidly. It is apparent that DAPL is continuing work every single day at an accelerated speed. We need Water Protectors to come to Standing Rock and physically support this resistance NOW.

The Dakota Access Pipeline Project is a gargantuan pipeline measuring approximately 1,172-miles and 30-inches in diameter. The proposed route aims to continue the exploitation of the Bakken and Three Forks areas in indigenous territories from so-called North Dakota to Patoka, Illinois. The outrageously expensive $3.8 billion pipeline aims to violently extract crude oil from sacred lands and transport it to major refining markets in an exploitative and environmentally disastrous manner. The pipeline backers are knowingly prioritizing their projected fiscal profits over the imminent threat to clean drinking water for the Sioux nation and millions of people downstream of the Mississippi.

Continue reading “Black Snake Destruction Report”

Women Confronting Feminicide: ‘We don’t want to live in fear’

Fed up with heightened violence, Mexican women joined in the mobilization against feminicide convoked from Argentina after the violent rape and murder of young Lucía Perez.

x carolina

It’s getting more dangerous all the time to be a woman (or girl) in Mexico, where seven sisters, friends, comrades, mothers or daughters are killed every single day with impunity — and with a level of hatred and scorn once unthinkable. Living breathing people, now tortured to death, become a cast of characters in a macabre spectacle: There’s the girl that’s dismembered, another beaten bloody, another impaled, another stuffed into a suitcase, yet another drowned in a sewer. Virtually all have been raped. This is the face of feminicide.

Fed up with this alarming situation, women in Mexico City and the states of  Guerrero, Guadalajara, Michoacán and Oaxaca, joined in the global mobilization against feminicide convoked from Argentina after the vicious rape and murder of 16-year-old Lucía Pérez, last October 8. The young girl was drugged and attacked by at least three men —Juan Pablo Offidani, Matías Farías and Alejandro Alberto Masiel— who left a pile of used condoms before raping her anally with a pole. According to the district attorney who investigated this crime, “extreme pain caused her death through stimulation of the vagal nerve,” prompting a heart attack.

Continue reading “Women Confronting Feminicide: ‘We don’t want to live in fear’”

Combative October 2: On the Institutionalization and Autonomy of Social Protest

The combative march brought together more than 400 libertarian, anarchist, and antifascist compañerxs who were able to get to Tlatelolco to remember the fallen from October 2, 1968 and to demand freedom for political prisoners.

Radio Zapote
October 5, 2016
Translated by Scott Campbell

Forty-eight years after the Tlatelolco massacre we continue demanding justice for the murdered, disappeared, persecuted, tortured, defamed, and imprisoned, as even though the killers and masterminds have not been tried and punished, those compañeros who fell in the militant struggle remain present in the popular and social struggles today as part of our memory, solidarity, guidance, dignity, strength, inspiration, rage and courage. Today, no one doubts that IT WAS THE MEXICAN STATE who planned and carried out that mass murder, just as it did with the disappearance of 43 teaching college students on September 26, 2014, as from Tlatelolco to Ayotzinapa one can trace a historical continuity that affirms the totalitarian character of the state that today we can characterize as “narco and terrorist.”

Continue reading “Combative October 2: On the Institutionalization and Autonomy of Social Protest”

San Pedro Tlanixco: Who says all is lost?

A rally and march around the Santiaguito prison in Almoloya de Juarez closed out a series of Activities for the Freedom of the Defenders of the Water and Life of San Pedro Tlanixco.

x carolina

“¿Quién dice que todo está perdido? (Who says all is lost?)” sang the Taller del Sur at the cultural festival held last September 25 as part of the Activities for the Freedom of the Defenders of the Water and Life of San Pedro Tlanixco.

And five days later, as the round of activities closed with a rally and march around Santiaguito prison at Almoloya de Juárez, the answer was clear. Nobody. In spite of the vicious repression brought down on this Nahua town by the State of Mexico’s (in)justice system, there’s no end to the struggle to free the eight guardians of the territory of San Pedro Tlanixco. On the contrary, as of 2014, the movement is rebuilding and getting stronger.

Continue reading “San Pedro Tlanixco: Who says all is lost?”

New Documentary: Oaxaca Ingobernable

With this documentary, we want to make public what took place between June and August of 2016, through the voices of the citizens, teachers, mothers, and municipal authorities of Oaxaca.

Since June of 2016 — ten years since the uprising that for more than six months this state in the south of Mexico participated in — professors and communities from the eight regions of Oaxaca returned to the streets.

Their main demand is the repeal not only of the educational reform, but also of the whole package of structural reforms better known as the “Pact for Mexico,” which the administration of President Enrique Peña Nieto—under the influence of the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund and the Inter-American Development Bank—has been trying to impose since 2013.

Continue reading “New Documentary: Oaxaca Ingobernable”

Anarchist Prisoners in Mexico on Hunger Strike in Solidarity with US Prison Strike

Today we declare an indefinite hunger strike for total liberation as an act of self-determination, of incitement to widespread revolt.

Noticias de Abajo and Anarchist Black Cross – Mexico
September 28, 2016
Translated by Scott Campbell

During a press conference on September 28, anarchist prisoners announced the beginning of an indefinite hunger strike. They are compañeros Fernando Bárcenas and Abraham Cortés, prisoners in North Prison, Luis Fernando Sotelo, prisoner in South Prison in Mexico City, and Miguel Peralta, prisoner in Cuicatlán Prison in Oaxaca. The strike is in rejection of the 33 year and five month sentence given to Luis Fernando Sotelo, to mark three years since the arrest of compañero Abraham Cortés on October 2, 2013, and in solidarity with the prison strike underway in the United States against the exploitation of prisoners’ labor and in support of the revolts against the killings of African-Americans by police in the U.S.

The three compas in Mexico City have gone on hunger strike, while Miguel will go on fasts.

Continue reading “Anarchist Prisoners in Mexico on Hunger Strike in Solidarity with US Prison Strike”

War and Resistance Dispatch # 44

The face of the 43 missing and the tenacity of their families and compañeros are the other 43 dispatches on war and resistance. To them we add the pain, rage, and resistance of the originary peoples and the rebellions of millions all over Mexico and around the world.

Enlace Zapatista
September 22, 2016

To the peoples of the world:

To the alternative, free, autonomous, or whatever-you-call-it media:

To the National and International Sixth:

War and Resistance Dispatch #44

And what about the other 43? And the ones that follow?

This country has not been the same since the bad government committed one of its most heinous crimes in disappearing 43 young indigenous students of the teaching college Raúl Isidro Burgos in Ayotzinapa, Guerrero, two years ago. This event forced us to acknowledge the profound darkness in which we find ourselves today, stirring our individual and collective hearts and spirit. The rage, pain, and hope embodied in the families and compañeros of the 43 illuminate that darkness and shine on the faces of millions of people of every geography below in Mexico and around the world, as well as among a conscientious international civil society in solidarity.

As originary barrios, tribes, nations, and peoples, we begin from the collective heart that we are and turn our gaze into words.

Continue reading “War and Resistance Dispatch # 44”