U.S. Army Operations to Advance in Mexico

With U.S. Military support, the Mexican and Guatemalan armed forces created a Task Force to carry out operations on the Mexico and Guatemala border.

By Santiago Navarro F
Avispa Midia
April 27, 2017
Translated by El Enemigo Común

With the support of the Southern and Northern Commands of the U.S. Military, the Mexican and Guatemalan armed forces have begun the creation of a new elite group, a Task Force that will carry out joint operations on the border shared by Mexico and Guatemala. This elite group is added to the seven Task Forces created and formed by the government of the United States together with Central American governments.

According to General Juan Manuel Pérez Ramirez, Chief of the Guatemalan Defense Staff, this Task Force will carry out reconnaissance work, including aerial and ground patrols, sharing information and intelligence to combat transnational organized crime. In February of 2017, a special report by Avispa Media documented the Southern and Northern Commands’ visit to Mexican territory, as well as to Honduras and Guatemala, where participants requested anonymity.

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Cartel Land: A myopic glance at Michoacán reality

Little research has gone into the film, and the narrative lacks depth and analysis. It’s full of holes.

By Romeo LopCam – A number of critics have said that Cartel Land by Matthew Heineman is a good documentary, «basic for understanding what’s gone on in Michoacán in the last few years.» They exaggerate. The film shows only a small part of this reality, a fact the director consistently overlooks. He gives no context or perspective, just a sequence of dramatic scenes that grab the reader’s attention with sensationalistic details. Little research has gone into the film, and the narrative lacks depth and analysis. It’s full of holes.

The story he tells us is limited to what has happened in the Tierra Caliente (Hotlands) area —with no mention of the P’urhépecha Plateau or the Coastal Highlands region. It focuses on the charismatic figure of Doctor José Manuel Mireles Valverde, a man who has certainly played a key role in the uprising in Michoacán, but does not fully exemplify it. And here it must be said that given its complexity, no individual could do so.

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SOA Graduate Takes Control of Security in Michoacán, Mexico

General Pedro Felipe Gurrola, a US Army School of the Americas graduate has taken control of security for the state of Michoacan, Mexico.

[ WHINSEC/SOA Logo ]

by Simón Sedillo

Alfredo Castillo, the federal envoy in charge of security for the State of Michoacán since January 2014 has stepped down and is being replaced by General Pedro Felipe Gurrola Ramírez, a US Army School of the Americas (SOA) graduate. The School of the Americas is notorious for training a wide variety of infamous military officials from all over Latin America in strategies and tactics which include but are not limited to torture, coercion, kidnapping, rape, murder, mutilations, massacres, mass media manipulation, political manipulation, and paramilitarism. In 1989, religious based faith groups and concerned individuals created the School of the Americas Watch, an organization that has outspokenly opposed the SOA, demanded the release of the names of individuals trained at the school, and exposed a number of atrocities and crimes committed by SOA graduates throughout Latin America.

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Community Ronda from Cherán, Michoacán Prevents Narco-Corrido Concert by “El Komander”

Narco-corridos have become extremely popular among Mexican youth who have been consistently desensitized to narco-violence and corruption within the Mexican state.

[ Barricada. Cheran, Michoacan. December 15th, 2013. Photo: Simón Sedillo ]

By Simón Sedillo

A “narco-corrido” concert by “El Komander” had been promoted  to take place in Cherán, Michoacán at 3pm on December 15th, 2013. El Komander is known for singing about organized crime and in particular about the Gulf Cartel. Even though the Gulf Cartel isn’t active in the Purépecha plateau, where the community of Cherán is located, community members clarify that they are absolutely against any type of organized crime organization and the activities that revolve around them, including narco-corridos of any type.

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Designed to Kill: Border Policy & How to Change It

This analysis is the work of an individual participant in No More Deaths: for a glimpse into
the lives of those who risk death to cross the border, read Four Stories from the Border.

for everyone who didn’t make it, and for everyone who did

For a number of years now I’ve worked in the desert on the Mexican-American border with a group that provides humanitarian aid to migrants who are attempting to enter the United States—a journey that claims hundreds of lives every year. We’ve spent years mapping the trails that cross this desert. We walk the trails, find places to leave food and water along them, look for people in distress, and provide medical care when we run into someone who needs it. If the situation is bad enough, we can get an ambulance or helicopter to bring people to the hospital. We strive to act in accordance with the migrants’ wishes at all times, and we never call the Border Patrol on people who don’t want to turn themselves in.

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National Peace March ends in Mexico City Zócalo

[ Gringos Don’t Arm the Narco ]

x carolina

When the March for Peace with Dignity and Justice, headed by the poet Javier Sicilia, got to the Mexico City Zócalo at 4 o’clock in the afternoon on May 8, tens of thousands of people had joined the protest that left the National University campus at 8:30 that morning. Fed up with all the blood spilled in Felipe Calderon’s supposed war against drug traffickers, women, men, young people, children on foot or sometimes riding bicycles, and even quite a few babies in strollers, gradually filled the streets. The Mexico City police estimate an attendance of 65,000, while the march organizers say there were 200,000 demonstrators. One thing sure is that after 1 o’clock in the afternoon you could walk for several blocks in the middle of the march without seeing the beginning or the end of the river of people.

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Oaxaca marches against Calderón’s drug war

By Scott Campbell

On Sunday, May 8, several hundred demonstrators took to the streets in the city of Oaxaca to voice their opposition to Mexican President Felipe Calderón’s so-called “war against organized crime,” which after more than four years of brutal violence unleashed by the army, police and drug cartels (often overlapping professions) has left nearly 40,000 people dead. The march in Oaxaca coincided with the National March for Peace with Justice and Dignity, which left from Cuernavaca, Morelos on May 5 and ended with a rally in the zócalo of Mexico City this evening. Over the course of the weekend, marches occurred in all thirty one states and the Federal District of Mexico, as well as in dozens of cities worldwide.

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